Cummins Vessel References

Shipbuilders and sailors all over the world depend on Cummins engines and generators to power their vessels. Whether you're on the water for fun, profit, or adventure (or all three), you know that Cummins has you covered.

Esteemed marine author Alan Haig-Brown writes the interesting and insightful vessel references listed below, complete with contact information if you want to know more about each installation.

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When it comes to selecting a design for a new series of vessels, the most important consideration is to recognize the craft’s purpose and develop a form to meet that function. Cooke Aquaculture in Atlantic Canada has a number of fish farms located in protected waters around the Maritime Provinces. Supplies and gear have to be transported between the farms and the shore.
Peregrine Falcon boat builders, of Eagle River near Anchorage Alaska, have a history of innovation from aluminum landing craft to Bristol Bay gillnetters. They recently sea trialed Bryan Mcmahan’s Esa Ruth, the first of their latest pair of Bristol Bay boats that will be turning some heads on the Bay during this Summer’s sockeye season.
The export of refined iron ore from Australia to China has led to the development of gigantic infrastructure especially for the loading process from shore to ship. The company web page describes this process as follows: “The magnetite concentrate is exported to China from a purpose-built port at Cape Preston. From the stockyard, the product is transported to the barge loading berth at the breakwater through the 4.4km conveyor belt.
James Dewing started building boats in Australia and he has since built in China before settling in Thailand. As for other expats he finds the country to be the countries relaxed life style and excellent food a perfect fit for him. And, like Toyota, Nikon and other high tech industries he has found an educated and skilled workforce.
To be an accomplished diving master in Thailand with access to both the Andaman Sea and the Gulf of Thailand would be about as good as it gets. But it is one huge step up the joy register to own your own diving support vessel. This is especially true if you can also accommodate 30 fellow divers and a supportive crew of eight to cater to the divers’ needs and navigate the vessel.
Seacrest’s Managing Director Tavipol Hemangkorn receives guest in a board room decorated with models of large crew boats, ASD tugs and a range of other vessels that his firm has built. Located just outside the mouth of the Chaophraya River at Samutprakarn, Thailand the yard’s three marine ways can launch vessels directly into the deeper waters of the Gulf of Thailand. They can accommodate vessels up to a 22-meter beam and up to 2500 metric tons.
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