Cummins Vessel References

Shipbuilders and sailors all over the world depend on Cummins engines and generators to power their vessels. Whether you're on the water for fun, profit, or adventure (or all three), you know that Cummins has you covered.

Esteemed marine author Alan Haig-Brown writes the interesting and insightful vessel references listed below, complete with contact information if you want to know more about each installation.

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From the early 17th to the mid 18th century the Dutch maintained a post on the Chao Phraya River near the ancient Thai capital of Ayutthaya. Today little remains of the old Dutch buildings but a fine new museum has been built on the site, Baan Hollanda informs the modern visitor of that important era.
 When Khun Namchai Sakunchoknamchai was seven years old he like cars. So he built himself one out of wood. Decades later, he was building those big beautiful custom tour buses that are a feature of Thai roads. When he wanted a 30 million baht machine for shaping rolled aluminum sheet, he designed and built one for less than nine million THB. This machine is just one of the impressive array of technologically sophisticated machines at his factory in Suphanburi, Thailand.
A recent report by the Ghana Ports and Harbour Authority states, “Total cargo traffic for both ports (Tema and Takoradi) grew from 19,459,834 tonnes in 2016 to 22,086,626 tonnes in 2017, registering a 13 per cent increase. Transit cargo in both ports also increased from 944,081 tonnes in 2016 to 1,249,336 tonnes in 2017, a rise of 32 per cent. Container traffic for both ports rose from 942,463 TEU in 2016 to 1,009,755 TEU in 2017, registering a seven per cent increase.”
 Thousands of people travel Alaska on mega-cruise ships each year, but only a handful get to cruise Alaskan waters on the immaculate M/V LISERON. Built in Seattle in 1952 by the US Navy as a minesweeper she was sold to France, but returned to Seattle in 1990 after being lovingly converted to yacht-class in Florida.
Fish companies from New Zealand to Russia (currently 24 large and ultra large Russian vessels) and Iceland to the USA as well as Greenland and now Canada have chosen the Norwegian firm Skipsteknisk when it comes time to design a new vessel. The firm has garnered a reputation for designing and overseeing the construction of vessels that integrate the most up to date technology from deck equipment to processing and stowage.
With Weeks Marine reaching their 100th anniversary in 2019, it is fitting that they would be running one of their crew boats with Cummins’ latest marine engine, the X15 as 2019 also represents the centenary for Cummins. Weeks began as a stevedoring company in the Port of New York. Today their dredging and other operations span much of North and South America.
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